Writing Is A Bad Habit: Up In Smoke! a.k.a. Writing Burn-Out

It’s been a while, my friends.

If you couldn’t tell by the title of this article, I’ve been essentially in burn-out recovery for the past few weeks. Many of us who write know of the stress that attempting NaNoWrMo can bring on, trying to write an entire novel-length manuscript in a month.

Try doing that three months in a row. Three whole novels in three months with deadlines and marketing windows to hit and all of that good grid.

It’s enough to change a man!


Monday Musings: Manuscript Homestretch! a.k.a. Almost A Return To Normal

Quick update this Monday before I get back to the hard work of writing!

The third book of Clans of Shadows is reaching completion, at least the manuscript I and J. A. are working on. Then it’s the usual editing and all that jazz, but we should still be able to squeak it out before the end of the month.

What this means is that my writing load is going to lighten some for the next few months. Oh, there’s still books to be written, like Packie’s Problem (the next Redmane Mystery) and the final editing for The Twelfth Labor, but there won’t be the very tight deadlines needed for this collaboration series.

What that really means is that Starving Reviews should be back on the table in November! Let’s hope I get some good books on the plate to come back to!

Until Wednesday, good reading, good writing, and good luck!

Writing Is A Bad Habit: Our X Is Not Like Your X! a.k.a. Shading Your Tropes (For Better or Worse)

We’re back, baby!

So let’s kick this off right with some Bad Habit Writing and I think the best way to go is with some classic trope talk. In case you’ve forgotten or you never knew, tropes are common literary devices, similar to the idea of archetypes, that are commonalities through out genres, media types, and so on. As with archetypes, tropes aren’t good or bad; they are tools in the creator’s toolbox. How we use them determines their value.

Now that we have the basics out of the way, let’s talk about a classic one: Our X Is Like/Not Like Your X!


Book News: A Scouted Review! a.k.a. Jada Ryker and The Songstress Murders

Here’s a cool one!

Jada Ryker, winner of the 2016 Kindle Scout contract, threw out a review of The Songstress Murders the other day. Take a look!


General News: It’s Been Too Long! a.k.a. No Excuses But Life’s Been Crazy!

Right, so it’s been a while, friends.

Two books released, a very fun and profitable convention, and another manuscript baking in the oven as we speak. Meanwhile, I’ve been silent.

Well, all I can say is that everything has been crazy. There’s been moving (not myself, but others), cleaning, a bout or two of sickness, and a pulled shoulder. Oh, and FIFTY-FOUR HOURS ON A GREYHOUND BUS!

I can’t stress that last thing enough.

It’s enough to strain the soul!

But I’m back now. Crap is going to get done. I have two more books coming this year at the very minimum. Namely the next book of the Cults of ShadowFists of Iron, and the last book of Three Seconds to LegendThe Twelfth Labor. And don’t worry, the second Inspector Redmane MysteryPackie’s Problem, is still coming and I have a special new project in the works, a light novel actually, but we’ll save more info on that for later.

We’re still going to be light on Starving Reviews until November, when my last deadline for the year is done, but I have multiple books lined up and partly read, so they’ll come quickly then.

Oh, and finally, the Released Books and Upcoming Books are updated! Go there for links to grab my latest releases, like The Tale of the Tape and Feet of Clay.

Until next time, good reading, good writing, and good luck!

Indomitable (The Push Chronicles Book 1) By J B Garner

Here’s another insightful review for Indomitable! Thanks for your time and thoughts!

Read, Breathe, Pray, Write

“Reality is subjective if you only have enough belief to change it!”

~ Indomitable by J B Garner

The first book in a series, Indomitable introduces the reader to Irene Roman, an unlikely super hero. She was forced in to survival which in turn forced her to become a hero. This story reminds me of The Rook by Daniel O’Malley in that the female lead is an unlikely hero. She is intuitive, strong and brave. All the best qualities for a female hero.

What I liked about this book is Garner’s use of words in ways that force us to rethink language. For example, in the story the world is now inhabited by people with super powers. These people are called the Pushed. The concept was a little hard to grasp at first but they were pushed in to these powers by a force that caused this altered state. The reader…

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